Our Most Recent Project

A year ago the renovation began. I joined efforts with John J. Nolis, an accomplished architect and a classmate/ graduate of mine from Anne Arundel Community College’s Interior Design Program and our builder, David Krebs.

Our goal was to open up walls, refresh a dated look, add new architectural details and use built-ins for storage.

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We opened up a wall( but not entirely) and dressed up the railing with a painted white Chippendale pattern. The opened areas allowed abundant natural light which better showcased the art collection.

We created 5 foot openings and detailed railings around the staircase, which transformed the rectangular and linear area into a triangular and dimensional one. Now where the 3 rooms join, one’s eyes dance around the triangle of natural light, architectural details, cherry banisters and art! 

After opening walls, we needed to come up with a pantry design to store dishes and kitchen equipment. John sketched several designs based on our joint ideas, and we finally agreed on a handsome cabinet drawing with 4 small lighted cabinets at the top.  John sent the sketch to Crowne Point in New Hampshire for construction.

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Next, we decided that the hallway was too long and dark.  He sketched a door that would divide the hallway and open into a Master Bedroom suite.  We chose an etched glass door to allow light in the hallway and offer texture and interest.

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The bedroom suite includes a laundry area, a 10” x 12” Master closet with built-ins  and a large Master Bathroom. At one time the Master Closet was another bedroom.  Now, it captures a separate space for dressing, with both closed and open shelving. I did not want the closet to just be a closet. I wanted shelves to have doors to hide the shoes and apparel.  John sketched built-ins for clothing and shoes, glass shelves for books, open shelves for a printer and a desk for computer use.  It is now a multi-purpose room.  However, we still call it “The Dressing Room.”

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For the Master Bathroom, we used a porcelain white 8” x 13” floor tile from Atlas Marble and Tile,  For the walls and shower walls we used a subway gray - white patterned 3” x 8” tile on the lower half of the wall - 42” up from the floor and 9’ high throughout the shower. And for the shower floor, we used a 1”x1” basket weave patterned tile.  Finally, we used a quartz counter top for the 2 sink, 64” long, open-shelf vanity.  John and I also designed a soaking tub on one end, and a 6’ x 8’ glass shower on the other end from Ferguson’s ... the tub looks through a large window on the river and bird life, and the shower wall has a water and bird mosaic ( 30” x 40”) to reflect the real life scene. 

We chose 1 chandelier and 3 polished nickel sconces for the Master Bathroom and a chandelier for the Master Closet from Annapolis Lighting, as well as several 4” LED recessed lights for both rooms.

The first floor has refinished natural wood floors, and David Krebs, a master craftsman, carried out our plans with meticulous execution.

For the next project, I chose window treatments and bed linens with the help of Beth McFeely Window Fashions.  Stay tuned.

New Thoughts, New Looks

 

Mid-Century ... is it here for good ?

If you go to any furniture store you will see Mid- Century Design.  You will see Mid-Century's bold graphics and quirky designs in fabrics for your windows, linens or pillows. In a kitchen store, you will see Melamine dinnerware sets. And in wallpaper, you can decorate walls with fun!

 I believe I first saw the look eight years ago.  At first, I thought the millennials were the only audience interested. I was wrong.  Most of us like it for its lean lines, the materials used and the architectural uniqueness.  It feels fun and fresh!  Most would like to consider using a chair or something new in their living spaces.  I say, "you can do it."  I believe that to change to Mid-Century gives a space something new with something old.  It stirs up memories and conversation too about past designers like Eero Saarinen, Alvar Aalto, Charles and Ray Eames. By adding a Mid- Century piece, you introduce a "wow" factor. Try it!

 

 

 

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